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55 litre petrol tank took 58+ litres
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10 posts in this topic

According to my manual, all 2 wheel Kadjar's have a 55 litre petrol tank. I filled up yesterday up until the first automatic shut off (I never put more than that in to allow for any expansion) and I had put in 58.22 litres???

Anyone else had something similar? Do I assume that the neck of the tank isn't included in its capacity (over 3 litres worth???)? 

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Haha. It's common in my country when the gas stations lies to you and charges you more than what you load . That's why we're careful and choose only proper places.

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Good point AOne, never thought of that. If the OP is British then he should have reported it, it could be a dodgy Pump. Never happened to me thank God.

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In manual stays "useful volume" of fuel tank. Then you have pipes and of course temperature of fuel.

so according to manual volume shouldn't be less then 55l but could be more... case by case. 

And don't buy rumors about cheating... try to measure with certified measures... 1l will be 1l on 

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On 24/01/2018 at 9:56 AM, dgutte said:

According to my manual, all 2 wheel Kadjar's have a 55 litre petrol tank. I filled up yesterday up until the first automatic shut off (I never put more than that in to allow for any expansion) and I had put in 58.22 litres???

Anyone else had something similar? Do I assume that the neck of the tank isn't included in its capacity (over 3 litres worth???)? 

Part of it is temperature. It's mid winter, petrol contracts  when cold and expands when warm, for the same amount of mass and energy. Some pumps correct for this automatically so you have to pay for all that extra energy it e.g. it would be say 100 litres based on a (standardised) 15 deg C temperature but in reality only 98 litres at say 5 degrees C might have gone in, which would be equivalent to 100 litres at 15 degrees C energy-and price-wise. That lets you squeeze an extra 2 litres (or whatever) more into the tank.

So instead of charging a higher price for more energy per litre when it's  cold, which they could do if they wanted to, they 'fake' the litres and keep the price the same (if fitted with automatic temperature compensation - ATC). In summer, the reverse would apply. The pump should indicate if ATC is being used.

Plus all the other things mentioned above as  the specs wil only be approximate.

Edited by shedder101
part of text stops post and needs approval please dont use the quote function on this post , thanks shedder

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there looks to be some problems with this topic, posts from members are needing approval if you use a quote from Dave4774. 

 

there is nothing wrong with this post that i can see, it might be the backend software see something, who knows?

i have PM Dave4774 to apologise and he is going to re post his post, edited down a bit, hopefully that should cure it.   

alternatively.... start a new topic and go from there 

 

Shedder101

Mod

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On 25/01/2018 at 3:20 PM, turboted10 said:

 

Problem is that car fuel systems allow for this although the difference is less once the car is warm. End result is that the car can overfuel when cold as extra "dense" fuel is input, but no more air so the extra fuel you gained is wasted.

Yes if you fill it to the brim, if it's warmer outside or in your tank than in the underground tank, it can overflow when it warms up and expands.

What I was saying in that earlier post that gave shredder101 a headache :o , is that automatic temperature compensation in some forecourt fuel pumps will display more litres than the actual fuel volume dispensed in winter, and fewer litres than the actual fuel dispensed in summer. In think that's how it works anyway, because petrol contracts when cold and expands when warm, but the energy content doesn't change. The alternative would be to alter the price but it would be changing so often that people would think the garage were on the fiddle! The standard temperature it's based on is 15 degrees C IIRC.

It's all covered by official regulations I think - and the pumps using it should display a notice to say so.

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I don't buy the temperature argument here. Unless gas temperature changes significantly for the short period it takes to load into your tank, then 55l measured by the pump should be exactly 55l in your tank. And even if you arrived at the gas station with 100ml of gas left in your car - overall in the tank, pipes and filter, I don't see how they could have pumped 58.2l in a 55l tank. I say they are cheating.

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On 27/01/2018 at 5:05 PM, Boyko said:

I don't buy the temperature argument here. Unless gas temperature changes significantly for the short period it takes to load into your tank, then 55l measured by the pump should be exactly 55l in your tank. And even if you arrived at the gas station with 100ml of gas left in your car - overall in the tank, pipes and filter, I don't see how they could have pumped 58.2l in a 55l tank. I say they are cheating.

No, it won't always be exactly 55L if the pump is an ATC pump (and the pump must say so). The differences in pumps are from the different temperatures in the underground tanks at different times of year, not between tank and car. Typically less than 1% says the government explanatory leaflet, because underground temperatures vary much less than air temperatures.  https://www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/283253/laymans-guide-on-sta-measurement-v2-march_2011.pdf

BUT... the biggest effect of petrol expansion will be after cold petrol from underground goes into a car tank on a hot day, it can (after a while) expand by a few percent so the petrol tank volume is probably quoted on the low side to hopefully reduce overspillages if your off to  park at home nearby on a scorcher. For the above reasons, the true Kadjar tank volume is likely more than the quoted 55L, the 58L mentioned could be the true volume. Who's going to run 30 miles into the empty zone then fill up to test it? ;):lol:

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