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Can I turn off tyre pressure monitoring?
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76 posts in this topic

I have acquired a kadjar so does that mean that if I need to change a tyre at the local tyre garage then I need to have a sensor put it? Where are the sensors? And do I have to go to the Renault dealer to have it calibrated ? 

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7 hours ago, Nordicgod said:

And do I have to go to the Renault dealer to have it calibrated ? 

No.

I just bought  them from e-bay and installed at the winter tires rims. They start working automagically.

https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/VDO-Tire-Pressure-TPMS-Sensor-Fits-LADA-NISSAN-RENAULT-Megane-MPV-407004CB0A/162625762874?fits=Car+Make%3ARenault&epid=2166236563&hash=item25dd40363a:g:t~IAAOSwiqtZjEOh

 

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Hi Yes  getting a little confused my self     ( happens a lot these days ). my thought is this when I need to fit new tyres  replacing  old worn out ones on our kj fitted on 19" wheels will the existing sensors have to be replaced to  fit new valves or do existing ones still work indeed is the valve even connected  to the sensor?????  I say this as we had a puncture a while  back and the sensor was not replaced but not sure about the valve , the sensor as I recall is stuck to the rim inside the tyre but not sure if connected to valve , so will I need new sensors Yes or no ??? 🤔

many thanks

JC😎😎🥃🥃☕️☕️

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Just now, J C said:

Hi Yes  getting a little confused my self     ( happens a lot these days ). my thought is this when I need to fit new tyres  replacing  old worn out ones on our kj fitted on 19" wheels will the existing sensors have to be replaced to  fit new valves or do existing ones still work indeed is the valve even connected  to the sensor?????  I say this as we had a puncture a while  back and the sensor was not replaced but not sure about the valve , the sensor as I recall is stuck to the rim inside the tyre but not sure if connected to valve , so will I need new sensors Yes or no ??? 🤔

many thanks

JC😎😎🥃🥃☕️☕️

The tyre pressure monitors are fitted to the wheel not the tyre so they don't need to changed unless they are damaged . New valves or stems can be fitted to the sensors if necessary

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Hi Yes I rather thought that was the case and thanks for that ulfire next thought ( is this two today before 9am ) what powers said sensors battery's ???🤔   And how long do they usually work for🤔

JC😎😎☕️☕️🥃🥃

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1 minute ago, J C said:

Hi Yes I rather thought that was the case and thanks for that ulfire next thought ( is this two today before 9am ) what powers said sensors battery's ???🤔   And how long do they usually work for🤔

JC😎😎☕️☕️🥃🥃

"The batteries in the closed-system sensors are expected to last five to seven years or 50,000 to 70,000 miles, but several tire dealers Tire Business spoke to said they haven't seen a high rate of battery failure—yet "

 

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6 minutes ago, ulfire said:

"The batteries in the closed-system sensors are expected to last five to seven years or 50,000 to 70,000 miles, but several tire dealers Tire Business spoke to said they haven't seen a high rate of battery failure—yet "

 

Useful, now, how do they actually work?  Much said on here and reported info about if you change the wheels around the signal comes from the wrong place etc etc.

Anybody got the definitive answer?, Arthur K's experience seems to suggest it's automatic in which case is there a receiver near each wheel that relays to the brain?

 

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Hi Yes I HAVE moved our wheels back to front I left pressures same so as to check  if sensors work , so when moved 31 front 34 rear  did reset thing on screen  drove down road  took a while about a mile and half to get numbers but it showed 31 front 34 rear so yes you can move wheels around no problem at all 😀😀😀

JC. 😎😎🥃🥃☕️☕️

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28 minutes ago, turboted10 said:

Useful, now, how do they actually work?  Much said on here and reported info about if you change the wheels around the signal comes from the wrong place etc etc.

Anybody got the definitive answer?, Arthur K's experience seems to suggest it's automatic in which case is there a receiver near each wheel that relays to the brain?

 

As I see it , it uses a GPS type system to locate wheel positioning so they would all be the same . Having individual sensors allocated to each wheel makes no logistical sense ...at least not to me . 

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1 hour ago, ulfire said:

As I see it , it uses a GPS type system to locate wheel positioning so they would all be the same . Having individual sensors allocated to each wheel makes no logistical sense ...at least not to me . 

I get what you say but it's far simpler than using GPS, that would have to be "weapons grade" system to pinpoint the difference between LH wheel and right.

Another thing that springs to mind is what about if a spare wheel with a sensor is stored in the boot?

If it is GPS ffs hope it doesn't use the same sats as the RLINK nav, it wouldn't know what car it was on let alone which wheel.;)

Edited;

 

From wikiwhatnot;

Direct TPMS[edit]

Main article: Direct TPMS

Direct TPMS employ pressure sensors on each wheel, either internal or external. The sensors physically measure the tire pressure in each tire and report it to the vehicle's instrument cluster or a corresponding monitor. Some units also measure and alert temperatures of the tire as well. These systems can identify under-inflation in any combination, be it one tire or all, simultaneously. Although the systems vary in transmitting options, many TPMS products (both OEM and aftermarket) can display real time tire pressures at each location monitored whether the vehicle is moving or parked. There are many different solutions, but all of them have to face the problems of exposure to hostile environments. The majority are powered by batteries which limit their useful life. Some sensors utilise a wireless power system similar to that used in RFID tag reading which solves the problem of limited battery life by electromagnetic induction. This also increases the frequency of data transmission up to 40 Hz and reduces the sensor weight which can be important in motorsport applications. If the sensors are mounted on the outside of the wheel, as are some aftermarket systems, they are subject to mechanical damage, aggressive fluids, as well as theft. When mounted on the inside of the rim, they are no longer easily accessible for battery change and the RF link must overcome the attenuating effects of the tire which increases the energy need.

A direct TPMS sensor consists of the following main functions requiring only a few external components — e.g. battery, housing, PCB — to get the sensor module that is mounted to the valve stem inside the tire:

  • pressure sensor;
  • analog-digital converter;
  • microcontroller;
  • system controller;
  • oscillator;?
  • radio frequency transmitter;
  • low frequency receiver, and
  • voltage regulator (battery management).

Most originally fitted dTPMS have the sensors mounted on the inside of the rims and the batteries are not exchangeable. This means, that when a battery reaches the end of its lifespan, the whole sensor has to be replaced. And even if it was possible to pop new batteries into an old sensor, it would not make much difference, because the sensor comes equipped with sensitive electronic elements, that also wear out with time and influenced by pressure and vibration[6]. When used in low-profile wheels, TPMS sensors wear out sooner, as well as when they are used in poor road conditions. With a battery change then meaning that the whole sensor will have to be replaced and the exchange being possible only with the tires dismounted, the lifetime of the battery becomes a crucial parameter. To save energy and prolong battery life, many dTPMS sensors do not transmit information when not rotating (which eliminates spare tire monitoring) or apply a complex, expensive two-way communication which enables wake-up of the sensor. For OEM auto dTPMS units to work properly, they need to recognize the sensor positions and must ignore the signals from other vehicles. There are numerous tools and procedures to make the dTPMS "learn" or "re-learn" this information, some driver implemented, others done by workshops. The cost and variety of spare parts, procedures and tools has led to trouble and confusion for customers and workshops.

Aftermarket dTPMS units not only transmit while vehicles are moving or parked, but also provide users with numerous advanced monitoring options including data logging, remote monitoring options and more. They are available for all types of vehicles, from motorcycles to heavy equipment, and can monitor up to 64 tires at a time, which is important for commercial vehicles. Many aftermarket dTPMS units do not require specialized tools to program or reset, making them much simpler to use.

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22 hours ago, ulfire said:

Understood Ted ...but how would you know if your tyres were the correct pressure with TPMS disabled ? You could pick up a nail in the tyre after pulling out of the garage . 

To me as an old faxt of 71 years.  I'm old enough to remember the days when we actually got out of the car and used a simple bit of kit called a Tyre Pressure Gauge and believe it or not, we even knew when we were hot or cold without the the car telling us!

However, I'm still awaiting a button to mute audio feedback from the wife while I'm driving.   :(

 

Edited by RTFishall
addtion

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1 hour ago, turboted10 said:

I get what you say but it's far simpler than using GPS, that would have to be "weapons grade" system to pinpoint the difference between LH wheel and right.

Another thing that springs to mind is what about if a spare wheel with a sensor is stored in the boot?

If it is GPS ffs hope it doesn't use the same sats as the RLINK nav, it wouldn't know what car it was on let alone which wheel.;)

Edited;

 

From wikiwhatnot;

Direct TPMS[edit]

Main article: Direct TPMS

Direct TPMS employ pressure sensors on each wheel, either internal or external. The sensors physically measure the tire pressure in each tire and report it to the vehicle's instrument cluster or a corresponding monitor. Some units also measure and alert temperatures of the tire as well. These systems can identify under-inflation in any combination, be it one tire or all, simultaneously. Although the systems vary in transmitting options, many TPMS products (both OEM and aftermarket) can display real time tire pressures at each location monitored whether the vehicle is moving or parked. There are many different solutions, but all of them have to face the problems of exposure to hostile environments. The majority are powered by batteries which limit their useful life. Some sensors utilise a wireless power system similar to that used in RFID tag reading which solves the problem of limited battery life by electromagnetic induction. This also increases the frequency of data transmission up to 40 Hz and reduces the sensor weight which can be important in motorsport applications. If the sensors are mounted on the outside of the wheel, as are some aftermarket systems, they are subject to mechanical damage, aggressive fluids, as well as theft. When mounted on the inside of the rim, they are no longer easily accessible for battery change and the RF link must overcome the attenuating effects of the tire which increases the energy need.

A direct TPMS sensor consists of the following main functions requiring only a few external components — e.g. battery, housing, PCB — to get the sensor module that is mounted to the valve stem inside the tire:

  • pressure sensor;
  • analog-digital converter;
  • microcontroller;
  • system controller;
  • oscillator;?
  • radio frequency transmitter;
  • low frequency receiver, and
  • voltage regulator (battery management).

Most originally fitted dTPMS have the sensors mounted on the inside of the rims and the batteries are not exchangeable. This means, that when a battery reaches the end of its lifespan, the whole sensor has to be replaced. And even if it was possible to pop new batteries into an old sensor, it would not make much difference, because the sensor comes equipped with sensitive electronic elements, that also wear out with time and influenced by pressure and vibration[6]. When used in low-profile wheels, TPMS sensors wear out sooner, as well as when they are used in poor road conditions. With a battery change then meaning that the whole sensor will have to be replaced and the exchange being possible only with the tires dismounted, the lifetime of the battery becomes a crucial parameter. To save energy and prolong battery life, many dTPMS sensors do not transmit information when not rotating (which eliminates spare tire monitoring) or apply a complex, expensive two-way communication which enables wake-up of the sensor. For OEM auto dTPMS units to work properly, they need to recognize the sensor positions and must ignore the signals from other vehicles. There are numerous tools and procedures to make the dTPMS "learn" or "re-learn" this information, some driver implemented, others done by workshops. The cost and variety of spare parts, procedures and tools has led to trouble and confusion for customers and workshops.

Aftermarket dTPMS units not only transmit while vehicles are moving or parked, but also provide users with numerous advanced monitoring options including data logging, remote monitoring options and more. They are available for all types of vehicles, from motorcycles to heavy equipment, and can monitor up to 64 tires at a time, which is important for commercial vehicles. Many aftermarket dTPMS units do not require specialized tools to program or reset, making them much simpler to use.

Is all this for the  benefit of me or the car industry/government.

Beam me up Scotty and give me back as a 17 year old (in the 1960's)  my old first car, a 1951 Hillman Minx and I'll be happy at 35mpg and a maxium of 60mph . We are all being conned!

PS. Tyres are spelt "Tyres" not "Tires" (Believe it or not we still drive on the left!)  lol

 

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10 minutes ago, RTFishall said:

Is all this for the  benefit of me or the car industry/government.

Beam me up Scotty and give me back as a 17 year old (in the 1960's)  my old first car, a 1951 Hillman Minx and I'll be happy at 35mpg and a maxium of 60mph . We are all being conned!

PS. Tyres are spelt "Tyres" not "Tires" (Believe it or not we still drive on the left!)  lol

 

It's mainly for the safety of people who never check their pressures and those who are such crap drivers that they are unaware that they are driving on their rims . We've all seen and heard them :D

The spelling is probably because these reports were probably copied and pasted from sites on the other side of the pond . They never could spell over there and they even have a president who makes words now and just about anything else :D

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17 minutes ago, ulfire said:

It's mainly for the safety of people who never check their pressures and those who are such crap drivers that they are unaware that they are driving on their rims . We've all seen and heard them :D

The spelling is probably because these reports were probably copied and pasted from sites on the other side of the pond . They never could spell over there and they even have a president who makes words now and just about anything else :D

Oh ulfire, I only wish I had your wisdom. :(

Still, perhaps it's because I now drive a French car and we all know how much the Frogs love us Brits!  :lol:

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1 hour ago, RTFishall said:

Oh ulfire, I only wish I had your wisdom. :(

Still, perhaps it's because I now drive a French car and we all know how much the Frogs love us Brits!  :lol:

Careful, they have us by the nuts remember. And from me referring to wikipedo as wikiwhatnot, not much respect in that direction either. 

They can spell it how they want, don't add up to a hal'porth of beans in states speak.

Ah, my old viva estate, rearwheel drive with knife edge tyres that let you know if they had lost a PSI or 2, BECAUSE YOU SIMPLY COULDN'T TURN THE DAM STEERING.

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3 hours ago, turboted10 said:

Careful, they have us by the nuts remember. And from me referring to wikipedo as wikiwhatnot, not much respect in that direction either. 

They can spell it how they want, don't add up to a hal'porth of beans in states speak.

Ah, my old viva estate, rearwheel drive with knife edge tyres that let you know if they had lost a PSI or 2, BECAUSE YOU SIMPLY COULDN'T TURN THE DAM STEERING.

Vauxhall Viva, you were lucky! It could have been worse, you could have had like me a Ford Popular. At least a Viva would start!  Or, even the worst car ever made the Morris Marina!

Believe it or not, there is even a Morris Marina Club still active. Just proves how many sad people still drive.  :lol:

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On 09/01/2018 at 5:30 PM, RTFishall said:

Vauxhall Viva, you were lucky! It could have been worse, you could have had like me a Ford Popular. At least a Viva would start!  Or, even the worst car ever made the Morris Marina!

Believe it or not, there is even a Morris Marina Club still active. Just proves how many sad people still drive.  :lol:

How dare you, I was the proud owner of a 1.8 Marina TC,  (;)).  Actually it was a quick car, faster than a 2ltr cortina GT but flat out at 90. Wore a set of steering trunnions out for every MOT

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Yep, agree with you Ted. I had a K reg Marina between 74 and 77. It never let me down. Yellowy Cack Brown with brown interior. No RLink2 or out of date maps in those days. How did we manage?

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1 hour ago, turboted10 said:

How dare you, I was the proud owner of a 1.8 Marina TC,  (;)).  Actually it was a quick car, faster than a 2ltr cortina GT but flat out at 90. Wore a set of steering trunnions out for every MOT

 

1 hour ago, turboted10 said:

How dare you, I was the proud owner of a 1.8 Marina TC,  (;)).  Actually it was a quick car, faster than a 2ltr cortina GT but flat out at 90. Wore a set of steering trunnions out for every MOT

Oh ulfire, I only wish I had your wisdom. :(

Still, perhaps it's because I now drive a French car and we all know how much the Frogs love us Brits!  :lol:

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1 hour ago, turboted10 said:

How dare you, I was the proud owner of a 1.8 Marina TC,  (;)).  Actually it was a quick car, faster than a 2ltr cortina GT but flat out at 90. Wore a set of steering trunnions out for every MOT

Well, for my sins I was given a Morris Marina GL as a company car in the early 1980's after having wondeful Cortinas previously. After having the Ford, I found the Morris tinnie and with terrible clutch. Even the noisey engine was still basically a vitually unchanged pre-war design. I hated the car so much I used to leave it unlocked in a car park in Brighton (Churchill Road) whilst at work, a place then noted for car theft. It was never stolen:(.  A guy I worked with even sometimes left his with the keys in! The thieves clearly obviously knew their cars.

Later in life I got to know a guy who worked on the Marina production line in Birmingham. He once told me you only needed to look in the worker's car park to see what most of them drove  (Fords and Vauxhall) despite a company purchase discount for employees!:rolleyes:

Then came salvation, I was given a Vauxhall Cavalier in replacement. Happy days.

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53 minutes ago, RTFishall said:

Well, for my sins I was given a Morris Marina GL as a company car in the early 1980's after having wondeful Cortinas previously. After having the Ford, I found the Morris tinnie and with terrible clutch. Even the noisey engine was still basically a vitually unchanged pre-war design. I hated the car so much I used to leave it unlocked in a car park in Brighton (Churchill Road) whilst at work, a place then noted for car theft. It was never stolen:(.  A guy I worked with even sometimes left his with the keys in! The thieves clearly obviously knew their cars.

Later in life I got to know a guy who worked on the Marina production line in Birmingham. He once told me you only needed to look in the worker's car park to see what most of them drove  (Fords and Vauxhall) despite a company purchase discount for employees!:rolleyes:

Then came salvation, I was given a Vauxhall Cavalier in replacement. Happy days.

I know we are so far off topic etc, but, when the 1st front wheel drive cavs came out in about 82, my 1st was an X plate, it was the 1st time a decent family car got into the hands of your average Joe. I had nothing but 3 year old ex co cars, all Vx for the next 20 years.

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On 1/8/2018 at 2:20 PM, Lindser said:

I do apologise! My big fat finger must have slipped! Mine is indeed 34 and 31!

So, 2017 have also 18" wheels. Mine, 2016 has only 17" and 19"...

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